Feel Good Wearing These Fair Trade & Sustainable Clothing Lines

In recent years, consumers are becoming more aware of the moral and environmental implications of “fast fashion,” or mass-manufactured trendy clothing sold at chains such as H&M. It’s no secret that these “affordable” garments are meant to fall apart after just a few wears, and that unfair labor practices are used in the manufacturing process. If you’re looking to be kinder to your wallet, the environment, and laborers everywhere, here are some affordable, ethically-produced, and fashionable alternatives to fast fashion chains:

Pictured: The Slim Fit Long-Sleeve Linen ($55) - Photo courtesy of Everlane

Pictured: The Slim Fit Long-Sleeve Linen ($55) – Photo courtesy of Everlane

Everlane
Men’s and Women’s Apparel

This San Francisco-based company was built on the ethos of “radical transparency,” or the idea that consumers should know where their clothes were made, how they were created, and exactly how much it cost to make them. Since Everlane is online-only, they incur none of the expenses that come with owning a brick-and-mortar business and pass those savings on to the consumer. They have strict workplace compliancy standards for all of their factories, four of which are located in the US. Known primarily for high-quality basics like tees and sportswear, Everlane is expanding their selection to include trendier pieces as well.

Pictured: Fair Trade Organic Sleeveless Shirt Dress ($44.99) - Photo courtesy of Fair Indigo

Pictured: Fair Trade Organic Sleeveless Shirt Dress ($44.99) – Photo courtesy of Fair Indigo

Fair Indigo
Men’s and Women’s Apparel

The primary mission of Fair Indigo is to help workers in developing countries through fair wages and sweatshop-free work environments, and they have also established some US factories in economically depressed areas. Their USA-made products are mostly accessories, but their internationally-produced garments are made from organic cotton and sustainably herded alpaca. Fair Indigo provides ethical, stylish clothing that won’t break the bank.

Pictured: Neary Pacaya Print Tee ($42) - Photo courtesy of Raven + Liiy

Pictured: Neary Pacaya Print Tee ($42) – Photo courtesy of Raven + Liiy

Raven + Lily
Women’s Apparel and Accessories

Raven + Lily currently helps employ marginalized women in India, Ethiopia, Kenya, Cambodia, Pakistan, Guatemala, and the USA at fair trade wages to give them access to a safe job, sustainable income, health care, education, and a real chance to to break the cycle of poverty for themselves and their families. They are an eco-friendly brand, using recycled paper and soy inks for tags, brochures, and bags. They also use locally-sourced, recycled materials whenever possible.

Pictured: Patras Slim Shirt ($41.40) - Photo courtesy of prAna

Pictured: Patras Slim Shirt
($41.40) – Photo courtesy of prAna

prAna
Men’s and Women’s Apparel

prAna is a member of the Fair Labor Association, a nonprofit dedicated to ending sweatshop conditions in factories worldwide. They make sure all of their vendors adhere to strict fair labor policies and offer a line of Fair Trade Certified Apparel, which includes items from Africa’s first fair-trade clothing company, Liberty & Justice. prAna sells clothing made from sustainable textiles such as organic cotton, hemp, recyced polyester, and Tencel.

Pictured: Arly Dress ($78) - Photo courtesy of Reformation

Pictured: Arly Dress ($78) – Photo courtesy of Reformation

Reformation
Women’s Apparel

Reformation manufactures most of their products in their own sustainable sewing factory in Los Angeles. They source sustainable fabrics and incorporate eco-friendly practices such as their heat-reflecting roof, use of renewable energy, and 100% recycled packaging for every order shipped. Reformation’s design focuses on effortless silhouettes to flatter the feminine figure, and they recently launched their “Low Carb” line, which uses as little carbon dioxide as possible in the manufacturing process.

Pictured: Alpaca Zip Cardigan ($189) - Photo courtesy of Indigenous

Pictured: Alpaca Zip Cardigan ($189) – Photo courtesy of Indigenous

Indigenous
Men’s and Women’s Apparel

Indigenous partners with clothing cooperatives in South America to provide fair trade, knitted and hand-loomed clothing for men and women. Artisans make a fair, living wage and receive training, educational materials, and equipment with the help of non-governmental organizations in partnership with Indigenous. All apparel and accessories are made only from natural fibers and low impact dyes.

Pictured: Organic Willy Tee ($48) - Photo courtesy of Kaight

Pictured: Organic Willy Tee ($48) – Photo courtesy of Kaight

Kaight
Women’s Apparel

Kaight has a store on Atlantic Ave in Brooklyn, but you can also shop their fair trade, zero-waste, locally produced garments online. Their collections are made from organic/sustainable textiles and upcycled materials. Kaight also carries products made by artisans in developing countries to facilitate their development of financial independence.

Pictured: The Perfect Tee ($28) - Photo courtesy of Modivanti

Pictured: The Perfect Tee ($28) – Photo courtesy of Modivanti

Modivanti
Men’s and Women’s Apparel

Modivanti requires that all designers adhere to their three baseline Conscious Standards (Upholding Workers’ Rights, Protecting the Environment, and Advancing Social Good) and uses a badge system to indicate how and why each item is fair trade and eco-friendly. Badges include Vegan, Zero Waste, and Artisan. Modivanti allows shoppers to filter items based on badges, so you can shop according to your preferences.

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