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Renzo Piano to Design Condos at 555 Broome Street

Having just finished the brand-new Whitney Museum along the High Line, Italian architect Renzo Piano has been selected to design the forthcoming condos at 555 Broome Street, formerly known as 100 Varick Street. Aside from a private home in Colorado, 555 Broome Street will be Renzo Piano’s first residential project in the United States. While his other work in New York City, like the New York Times Tower, has been more angular, this building will feature a more curvy appearance. So far, we only have one rendering of the interior, […]

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Brewer’s Row, A History of Breweries in Bushwick

With construction on the first of ten developments at the former Rheingold brewery site in Bushwick set to start this summer, I thought it might be interesting to look into the history of Bushwick’s breweries. The Rheingold brewery, which opened in 1883, was one of two dozen breweries operating in Bushwick at the time. Now, only two of the original buildings remain, one of which is home to a small brewery. What happened to Bushwick’s formerly thriving brewing industry? In the 1840s and 1850s, Brooklyn saw a wave of immigration […]

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The Power of Wind for a Greener New York

The power of wind has been used for thousands of years to sail ships, pump water, and grind grain.  The evolution of windmills over the years has gone from pumping water in Persia in 500-900 AD, to the modern-day wind turbine, which creates enough electricity to power a city.  Those wind farms you see – out in the country, out in the ocean, out at Union College in Schenectady – convert wind power directly into pollution-free, renewable electricity that can be used anywhere powerlines reach.  Wind power has so many […]

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Feel Good Wearing These Fair Trade & Sustainable Clothing Lines

In recent years, consumers are becoming more aware of the moral and environmental implications of “fast fashion,” or mass-manufactured trendy clothing sold at chains such as H&M. It’s no secret that these “affordable” garments are meant to fall apart after just a few wears, and that unfair labor practices are used in the manufacturing process. If you’re looking to be kinder to your wallet, the environment, and laborers everywhere, here are some affordable, ethically-produced, and fashionable alternatives to fast fashion chains: Everlane Men’s and Women’s Apparel This San Francisco-based company […]

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Denmark: A Worldwide Leader in Sustainable Living Practices

Although New York City is my home and there is no place I would rather be, I am proud of the sustainable living practices that come out of my home country.  Denmark has a long history of using design to improve solutions and society. Sustainability and environmental responsibility are a priority for an increasing number of Danish designers, making Denmark the epicenter of the growing trend in sustainable design. Here are some designers who work to create aesthetically pleasing, high-end, and sustainable pieces: Troels Grum-Schwensen Furniture Designer Troels Grum-Schwensen established […]

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Freshkills Landfill to Increase the Amount of Solar Energy Produced in NYC by 50 Percent

The world’s largest landfill will soon become NYC’s biggest solar energy plant. In 2013, Mayor Bloomberg announced that SunEdison will install a solar power facility over 47 acres of the former Freshkills landfill on Staten Island. This is part of a larger plan to turn the site into a 2,200 acre park, to be known as Freshkills Park. The park is the largest to be developed in New York City in over 100 years, and will be almost three times the size of Central Park. Situated on the western shore […]

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Organic Liquors and Beers, Made in NYC

As someone who strives to live sustainably in New York City, I’m always open to recommendations regarding locally sourced and organic food and drinks. Aside from sharing news about real estate in New York, one of the main purposes of my blog is to bring light to organizations and businesses that are making a positive impact on our city and world from an environmental standpoint.  Organic agriculture, in addition to producing safer, healthier food, benefits the environment by reducing pollution, conserving water, and protecting soil quality. Breweries and distilleries committed to […]

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Brooklyn, the Next Solar City?

Brooklyn may soon join Freiburg, Germany in a growing movement of solar cities, or cities that live completely off the electrical grid with the help of solar power. Over a decade ago, Rolf Disch designed Freiburg’s solar infrastructure, which produces 4 times as much energy as the city consumes. In February of this year, Governor Cuomo announced the state’s $40 million NY Prize energy competition, which will provide funding for designing and building microgrids across the state. Up to 10 communities can earn $7 million to support construction of a […]

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Rooftop Reds, New York’s First Rooftop Vineyard

Later this month, Rooftop Reds will officially launch New York City’s first commercially viable rooftop vineyard. There are plenty of craft breweries and a few spirits distilleries in NYC, but until recently, the closest we could get to “local” wine came from Long Island or upstate, sometimes several hours away. Devin Shomaker hopes to change that with his 14,000 square foot rooftop vineyard at the Brooklyn Navy Yard. In 2013, Shomaker recruited winemakers Evan Miles and Chris Papalia along with Thomas Shomaker to develop their Brooklyn-grown wine business, named Rooftop […]

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NYC Passive House Projects

It’s great to see how much the Passive House movement is picking up momentum throughout NYC and the world. As New York City looks to reduce 80% of greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 and affordable housing in the city becomes increasingly scarce, more developers are turning to Passive House building methods in order to tackle these problems. Developed by the Passive House Institute (PHI) in Germany, the Passive House is a building standard that minimizes the need for heating and cooling through cost-effective measures such as insulation and heat recovery – also known […]

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New York City’s Sustainable Furniture Makers

When buying furniture, it’s easy to consider the look, feel, and function of a piece. For the environmentally-conscious, however, sustainability is an equally important factor.  When I am not purchasing second hand or antique furniture because of their higher quality and sustainability factors, I always ensure that the businesses I purchase from maintain sustainable building and trade practices.  It should be no surprise that New York City has some of the most innovative furniture designers whose practices are good from an economic, ethical, and environmental standpoint.  Here’s a look at some […]

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Sustainable Living in NYC: Brooklyn’s Food Coops

The Park Slope Food Coop (PSFC), located in the heart of Park Slope, Brooklyn, was founded in 1973 and has more than 15,500 members today. The member-owned and -operated store serves as an alternative to commercial profit-oriented stores, saving members 20-40% on groceries in exchange for working 2.75 monthly hours at the store in such roles as checkout, stocking, packaging of bulk items, and walking members home with their groceries in a shopping cart. Only members are allowed to shop the PSFC’s selection of products which include local, organic produce; pasture-raised […]

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New Development on Tribeca’s Cobblestoned Hubert Street: 15 Hubert

Many people think of Tribeca, the coveted triangle below Canal Street, as quintessential New York City. The residential neighborhood that dates back to the late 18th century is seeing the development of Hubert Street, a four-block stretch between West and Hudson Streets. Hubert is one of the few remaining cobblestone roads in Manhattan and is a great backdrop to the most recent condo conversion at the landmarked 15 Hubert (as well as 10 Hubert and 11 Hubert Street). Built by John M. Forster in 1867 with Italianate elements, 15 Hubert (which also fronts at 407 […]

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The Table That Could Replace Your Air Conditioner, from ZeroEnergyFurniture

Design team Raphaël Ménard and Jean-Sébastien Lagrange have taken on the task of addressing energy efficiency and climate control issues through furniture, with a program they call ZeroEnergyFurniture. Ménard, an architect and engineer who founded Elioth, and Lagrange, a designer and graduate of the Ecole Boulle as well as ENSCI / Les Ateliers, have designed a table made from materials which could cut air conditioning bills by 30% and heating costs by 60%. The Climactic Table is made with a wax-like substance which absorbs heat when the room temperature reaches […]

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Beautiful Financial District 2 Bedroom, 71 Nassau Street, $1.845M

Torn from the pages of Architectural Digest, this apartment is as impeccably designed as it is welcoming. This gorgeous compilation of architecture and design was eloquently directed by Magness Design to bring you something extraordinary. Upon entering the apartment you are immediately struck by the expanse of windows, three exposures, open sky and city views. You will notice the detail to quality and design. An original steel beam column rises to the high ceilings invoking a bygone era. The kitchen island was rebuilt using Carrera marble and Rohl fixtures. High end […]

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